Old 06-15-2003, 11:49 AM   #1
erica
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default DAPP vaccination

What does it vaccinate against? I guess I never really knew and I going through Olive's paperwork from the shelter and I saw that DAPP was checked as given, but not Parvo, is this included in that shot?

I spend a lot of my time at the shelter these days and there have been a few parvo outbreaks. I always take a shower and wash my clothes right when I get home and don't touch the dogs until I'm clean, but I want to make sure she's vaccinated against it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2003, 12:08 PM   #2
MKLsMomBonnie
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,921
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

I think DAPP stands for
*Distemper/Adenovirus 2Parainfluenze/Parvovirus
not 100% sure though.
__________________
MKLsMomBonnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 11:45 AM   #3
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

the DAPP stands for - Distemper, Adenovirus (canine hepatitis), Parainfluenza, Parvovirus. You can still find the vaccine labeled as DHPP or DHLPP ( this covers only 1 Lepto spp.) it's best to have the DAPP and Lepto4 done vs. DHLPP. Any ways you're dog has been vaccinated for Parvo. thru the DAPP but you want make sure it's boostered yearly unless he's older and your DVM recommends doing the DAPP every 3 years. This is usually for dogs that are 5yrs+ and it also depends on their risk level too.

As far as the PARVO out breaks if you know there's is a outbreak I would suggest that you don't go to the shelter. PARVO can be spread very quickly and easily. Remember the only thing that kills the PARVO virus is bleach. Washing you're clothes with bleach would help but most important remember to clean your shoes as well. most people forget about their shoes. I've seen people visit at someones' house that had a parvo+ dog and then take it home to their puppy even after washing their hands and clothes. Also our high risk dogs are from ages 0 to 2 years or dogs who are not vaccinated at all.

If you ever have questions always check with your DVM or LVT. Trust me we don't mind answering questions. Hope this helps.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2010, 01:05 PM   #4
noofies
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,143
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Any ways you're dog has been vaccinated for Parvo. thru the DAPP but you want make sure it's boostered yearly unless he's older and your DVM recommends doing the DAPP every 3 years. This is usually for dogs that are 5yrs+ and it also depends on their risk level too.
Why in the name of Heaven would you vaccinate an animal yearly? Especially since the AVMA, as backward as they are on this issue, recommend puppy series, booster at a year, then every 3 years after that.

Challenge studies have shown 100% solid immunity for AT LEAST 7 years post-vaccination, and serology (titers) studies have shown immunity as long as 15 years for parvo and 9 years for distemper.

Boostering an animal that is already immune confers no additional immunity and carries the risk of serious, even fatal side effects.

Last edited by noofies; 02-22-2010 at 01:34 PM.
noofies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2010, 06:52 PM   #5
JMM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,624
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

Noofies, do you have a link to the study for 7 year 100% immunity?
__________________
JMM -- JaMi Maltese -- Dust Mops with Drive
JMM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2010, 05:19 PM   #6
noofies
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,143
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:dxKNueYn8PUJ:www.ivis.org/advances/Infect_Dis_Carmichael/schultz/ivis.pdf+%22Considerations+in+Designing%22&hl=en&g l=us&ct=clnk&cd=3

Quote: (from p. 6)


Expected Immunization Success

Since passively acquired antibody declines below the level where it can interfere with the current core vaccines by 12 to 14 weeks of age, modified live CPV-2, CDV and CAV vaccines given at this age will immunize a very high percentage of pups (>90%) and the immunity from that single dose of vaccine will last for several years. Our research on duration of immunity for the CPV-2, CDV and CAV vaccines has demonstrated a minimum duration of immunity of 7 years; the maximum duration of immunity may be for the life of most (>80%) vaccinated animals.

http://web.archive.org/web/200704020...guidelines.pdf

Quote: (P.13)

Canine Distemper Virus (CDV)

Challenge of immunity studies have shown that the minimum DOI for MLV-CDV vaccines derived from the Rockborn strain and the Onderstepoort strain are 7 and 5 years, respectively, and for the canarypox-vectored CDV vaccine, it is 1 year (not tested beyond 1 year). The minimum DOI for these same vaccines, using antibody titers at levels that provide sterilizing immunity, are 12 to 15 years for Rockborn and 9 years for Onderstepoort [Table 2].

Canine Parvovirus (CPV-2)

Challenge studies have shown that the minimum DOI for MLV-CPV-2 vaccines is 7 years. The minimum DOI for these same vaccines based on serological data for sterilizing immunity is up to 10 years [Table 2].

An article of interest from Dr. Jean Dodds: http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/Adob...cReactions.pdf

Quote:
Viral disease and recent vaccination with single or combination modified live-virus (MLV)
vaccines, especially those containing distemper virus, adenovirus 1 or 2, and parvovirus are
increasingly recognized contributors to immune-mediated blood disease, bone marrow failure,
and organ dysfunction. 1-11 Potent adjuvanted killed vaccines like those for rabies virus also
can trigger immediate and delayed (vaccinosis) adverse vaccine reactions.7-10 Genetic
predisposition to these disorders in humans has been linked to the leucocyte antigen D-related
gene locus of the major histocompatibility complex, and is likely to have parallel associations in
domestic animals. 5, 7
Beyond immediate hypersensitivity reactions, other acute events tend to occur 24-72 hours
afterwards, or 7-45 days later in a delayed type immunological response. 1-4, 6-10 Even more
delayed adverse effects include mortality from high-titered measles vaccine in infants, canine
distemper antibodies in joint diseases of dogs, and feline and canine injection-site
fibrosarcomas. 5,7 The increasing antigenic load presented to the host individual by modified-live
virus (MLV) vaccines during the period of viremia is presumed to be responsible for the
immunological challenge that can result in a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. 2, 3, 6, 7
The clinical signs associated with vaccine reactions typically include fever, stiffness, sore joints
and abdominal tenderness, susceptibility to infections, neurological disorders and encephalitis,
collapse with autoagglutinated red blood cells and icterus (autoimmune hemolytic anemia)
(AIHA), or generalized petechiae and ecchymotic hemorrhages (immune-mediated
thrombocytopenia)(ITP).1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 12, 13 Hepatic enzymes may be markedly elevated, and liver or
kidney failure may occur by itself or accompany bone marrow suppression. Furthermore, MLV
vaccination has been associated with the development of transient seizures in puppies and
adult dogs of breeds or cross-breeds susceptible to immune-mediated diseases especially
those involving hematologic or endocrine tissues (e.g. AIHA, ITP, potentially autoimmune
thyroiditis). 1,7,10 Post-vaccinal polyneuropathy is a recognized entity associated occasionally
with the use of distemper, parvovirus, rabies and presumably other vaccines. 2, 3, 7 This can
result in various clinical signs including muscular atrophy, inhibition or interruption of neuronal
control of tissue and organ function, muscular excitation, incoordination and weakness, as well
as seizures. 7 Certain breeds or families of dogs appear to be more susceptible to adverse
vaccine reactions, particularly post-vaccinal seizures, high fevers, and painful episodes of
hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD).7, 9
And just in case you don't find THAT scary enough, how about this?

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...ea91db2c9e7362

There's a growing suspicion that injectible feline vaccines for FVRCP are causing CRF in adult cats later in life.

As I said - vaccines are NOT benign. We shouldn't be giving animals any more vaccines than absolutely necessary to protect them from clinical disease. For greater than 90% of cats and dogs, that's ONE VACCINE given to a healthy animal at an age when they're able to mount an immunizing response.

BTW, Dr. Schultz and Dr. Dodds are currently doing DOI studies on the rabies vaccine, with an ultimate goal of proving a minimum DOI of 7 years. I think they're up to about 5 years now.

Last edited by noofies; 02-25-2010 at 05:21 PM.
noofies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2010, 08:10 PM   #7
JMM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,624
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

Thanks noofies...I only wish I've seen this in person. So sad to see adult parvo dogs with a vaccine history.
__________________
JMM -- JaMi Maltese -- Dust Mops with Drive
JMM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2010, 12:13 AM   #8
noofies
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,143
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

I have too. And you know why? Because they were vaccinated either 1) when they weren't completely healthy or 2) when they were too young to produce an immunizing response and they likely did not fully immunize. If you get incomplete immunization, you're never going to get full immunization no matter how many boosters you give.

Here's an example for you - I had a dog that was vaccinated as a puppy per rescue protocol and per the vet's recommendation, despite the fact that she had every intestinal parasite known to man. When I took her at a year to be titered, her parvo titer was high enough to be considered protective but her distemper titer was only 34 when a titer of 50 was considered protective. Fine, let's booster her. Gave her a distemper-only booster. A month later, we ran the titers again to see if the vaccine had been effective. Her titer was still 34. It hadn't budged. This was at the vet school. The supervising vet told me "you could booster her half a dozen more times and she would not respond to the vaccine - her titer would not go up. For better or worse, her immunity is what it is."

On the other hand, my 11 year old dog received ONLY two puppy vaccines. I titered her at a year, and again a year later, and she had very high titers. I quit doing it, and I've never boostered her. I had her titered this year, just out of curiousity, and her titers for both parvo and distemper were still way above what's considered protective. She *has* been exposed to the feces of recently vaccinated dogs so it's possible that's what kept her parvo titer high. But to the best of my knowledge, she has NOT been exposed to distemper, and the distemper vaccine antigen does NOT shed, and her titer was still protective.

Also, some dogs simply don't respond to vaccination. The DA2PPv vaccine is only 95% effective, some dogs simply won't immunize regardless of how many vaccines you give them. I lost a 6-month old beagle puppy to parvo after she'd received a series of 3 parvo vaccines, the last one at 16 weeks of age.

The same is true with human viral vaccines - I'm sure you've heard of cases where someone has contracted measles, for example, even though they've been vaccinated. I have a friend who is just recovering from the flu, and whose daughter just came down with it. They both got flu shots in November (seasonal and H1N1). Bad batch of vaccines, maybe?

I lost an adult rescue dog to what the vet and I were both SURE was parvo. But we ran two parvo tests, and both were negative. Whatever it was, it did a darn good job of imitating parvo but was actually NOT parvo.

Here's another little interesting fact - a study done at Purdue showed that even dogs that have NEVER been vaccinated for Parvo had titers considered protective. Parvo is so ubiquitous in the environment, as is the vaccine antigen (which is shed in the feces for up to 2 weeks after vaccination), that the dogs had been exposed to one or the other and had immunized as a result.

http://vonhapsburg.homestead.com/hay...nvaccines.html

(boldface is mine)

Quote:
The dogs in this study were divided into three vaccine groups (never vaccinated, partially vaccinated, and fully vaccinated) based on owner reports. Therefore, it was important to document the validity of these reports. This was done by measuring the antibody titer against distemper, parvovirus, and rabies, and comparing them with the owners’ answer to the question “How frequently and when was your dog vaccinated against distemper, parvovirus, and rabies?” A very significant and strong correlation was found between the owners’ responses regarding the pattern of administration of distemper vaccine and the distemper antibody titer. A similarly strong relationship was found for rabies. However, there was no clear-cut relationship between the parvovirus vaccine history and antibody titers to parvovirus. In fact, the parvovirus antibody titers of dogs belonging to owners who said they never vaccinated or only sporadically vaccinated their dog for parvovirus were not significantly different from dogs belonging to owners who claimed they had never vaccinated their dog against parvovirus. The findings with regard to rabies and distemper antibody titers support the validity of the owners’ answers on the questionnaire. It is not surprising however, that many dogs unvaccinated for parvovirus based on owners’ reports had antibody titers as high or higher against parvovirus than dogs that were reported to have been vaccinated against parvovirus either regularly or sporadically. Parvovirus is commonly shed in dog feces (either the vaccine or natural strain) and contaminates the environment of parks, homes, kennels, etc. Once in the environment it is highly resistant to a wide range of climatic conditions and is readily transmitted from dog to dog, by fecal oral contact. In contrast, distemper and rabies virus are not stable in the environment and transmission from dog to dog requires closer contact between individuals. Therefore, we believe the vaccine groups (never vaccinated, partially vaccinated, and fully vaccinated) to which dogs were assigned in this study were valid.


There's an easy way to know if the puppy DA2PPv vaccines produced an immunizing response - simply wait a month after the last shot and run a titer. If the level of circulating antibodies is "protective" or above, the dog has immunized and no further vaccines are necessary. Boostering a dog that has immunized does not confer any additional immunity. The body will respond to, and neutralize, the vaccine antigen the same way it would with the virulent virus, and it carries the risk of serious side effects.

I just denied an applicant because they're taking their current dog for annual boosters. And this is after they lost one dog to AIHA that was most likely caused by vaccination. IMO annual vaccination is tantamount to abuse.
noofies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2010, 06:17 PM   #9
JMM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,624
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

So what about a vaccine like the 4-way lepto that I keep reading only lasts 6-12 months? Obviously its a bacteria so a different story, but would you refuse somebody who lived in a high risk area if they did that annually? Or is there better info out there on duration?
I was torn about vaccinating my Roo for lepto this year...but he is very high risk and could easily die from a simple infection much less lepto. I will be happy to move away from here.
__________________
JMM -- JaMi Maltese -- Dust Mops with Drive
JMM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2010, 09:27 PM   #10
noofies
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,143
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

I don't give lepto, for the very reason you stated - the short DOI. That, and the fact that it's the most reactive vaccine there is. If I had a dog with a compromised immune system, and I lived in an endemic area, and I felt the dog had more than a small risk of contracting it, I might consider it.

No, I would not turn down an applicant for doing the lepto vaccine by itself. I would ask them about their risk factors, advise them of the potential for severe reactions, and let them decide if it's an acceptable risk for their particular situation. I would advise them to give it as a single-component vaccine, instead of in combination with a MLV vaccine. I would also advise them to consider their climate, and to give the vaccine at a time of year that a 6-month duration would give them the best coverage. (For example, the risk is minimal here in the winter, I'd advise local adopters to give it in March-April if possible so it would cover them through the summer and into late fall.)

Same thing with bordetella, which is also a bacteria vaccine. The DOI on that is ridiculously short, maybe only a couple of months. If I had a dog with a severely compromised immune system and I was going to put that dog in a situation where they were likely to to be exposed, I'd consider giving it. For example, if I was boarding a dog at the vet because it required medical care that a pet sitter couldn't give. But I can't tell you how many dogs I've had that have had or gotten kennel cough over the years - even old dogs, puppies, and dogs with chronic conditions - and only once has a dog required antibiotics. But I wouldn't give bordetella as a routine thing.

Last edited by noofies; 02-26-2010 at 09:32 PM.
noofies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2010, 11:04 PM   #11
JMM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,624
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

Roo has chronic kidney infections and UTIs. He also has diabetes insipidus. We see lepto in the clinic in which he spends his days and in which yard he runs and plays. Plus its becoming more and more of a problem just in our general area. We don't have a fenced off yard so he shares it with whatever passes through. I dislike this, but I hope I'm making the best decision for him.
__________________
JMM -- JaMi Maltese -- Dust Mops with Drive
JMM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2010, 12:30 AM   #12
newpup
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

we just got a new puppy she is a 3 month old dutch shephard/lab she had first two shots of DAPP before we got her, she is supose to have third one on monday. I am questioning if she should get it. It was recomended to me that we atleast get the first round of vaccinations. Is that really what is best? I have read some things about reactions to the shots is she more at risk getting the diseases or having a reaction? Is there homeopathics that would be good to give her, or anything else that would help strengthen her immune system?
newpup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2010, 07:22 PM   #13
JMM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,624
Default Re: DAPP vaccination

Your pup should get a DHPP at/after 16 weeks of age. Most vets recommend a DHPP every 3-4 weeks until that age.
__________________
JMM -- JaMi Maltese -- Dust Mops with Drive
JMM is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Vaccination Question DMH Poodles 0 05-16-2008 01:56 PM
Vaccination Reaction SamsonsMom Poodles 22 04-26-2007 05:53 PM
What's your vaccination schedule? Boscosmom The Dog House 11 06-21-2005 04:33 AM
More on Vaccination Protocol LynnE Poodles 1 01-28-2005 12:34 PM
Vaccination links..... Shelteez2 The Dog House 4 11-02-2003 11:35 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:10 PM.


Style design and concept by DigitalVB.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.